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boehner, basically had a deal in place, it ended up getting blown up at the last minute. i think there is a, perhaps, a new conciliation on both sides. i think they were waiting for the election to get over. i think the attitudes are positive on both sides. and i think they've got the framework for a deal already set up from last year. so i don't think that there are any closer but i also don't think they were that far away last year in 2011. >> do you think that closing the loopholes would be enough for a deficit reduction package? >> it doesn't appear that that's going to raise enough revenue to get to where the democrats want that to be. republicans say they don't want to raise rates. there are some -- there's some budget chicanery that can go on in terms of dealing with one baseline instead of another baseline. that's what it looked like boehner wanted to do last year. there are a lot of different options here. it's interesting, bill kristol from the weekly standard appeared to be talking to grover norquist, the anti-tax activist in those comments that he played earlier, talk
, the president is meeting with john boehner, the first face-to-face talk. in december 2010, you called your plan the moment of truth. almost two years later, but moment are we at now? >> i think this is the magic moment. a moment when our generation has the chance to really do something about this problem that we created. it is our generation that got us into this mess. i think we have a good chance. yet a second term democrats president who has come out and said he is willing to put entitlements on the table. big deal. you have a speaker, a republican speaker who really gets it. he understands the deaths of the problems they face. he has said the are going to put revenues on the table. big move. we got half the members of the senate already saying they will support a balanced plan. which makes a lot of sense. we have the business community lined up firmly for doing something. most importantly, we have the fiscal cliff. where if we go over it, we are going to face the most predictable economic crisis in history. for all of us in here, it is also the most avoidable. i think this is the magic mome
tax increases one way or another. bill: do you think that flies in the u.s. house? does john boehner have the votes to match that? >> the white house figures he will portray himself as the chapel yofnt middle class and the republicans are going out for the rift and he feels he can largely beat hem into submission. when they sit down to the bargaining table they might make some changes but he will want to come out of these negotiations as having largely won them and leaving scraps for the republicans. what the republicans have to hit back with is the way you increase revenues is by having rising incomes. you don't get that by higher taxes on a weakening economy. bill: the president plans to open the talks using his most recent budget proposal. wasn't that the budget that got zero votes in the senate? >> he's going to exploit it for all it's worth. you could come to an agreement using bowles and simpson and reducing rates so everyone declares victory. you have got more revenue but the rates don't go up. but i don't think the president is interested in that. if you had normal people doi
incomes now and ensuring security for the future. hthis is the end of vision that speaker boehner without for the country last week. i cannot think why the present would not embrace it. someone said we should go over the cliff. just go off of the cliff. hope for the best. i do not think that is what the american people had in mind when they went to the polls last week. but they had in mind is that we put the contest of the past two years behind us and work it out. the best way forward in the way that will lead to jobs and growth, a smaller deficits, and you were political fights is to keep everyone where they are. figure out a way to avoid the automatic defense cuts scheduled to hit at the end of the year without putting a penny last thing we promised and committed to the entitlement reforms that we all claim we want. a simpler tax code that lowers rates and cuts special interest loopholes would create jobs and result in more revenue without raising anyone's rates. we know this because we have seen it before. it actually works. i do not think washington should get any of that extra revenu
. john boehner still in the house for the time being at the treasury. the president is back in the white house and harry reid is in the senate with a few more seats. why should i believe this would end any more positively than the summer of 2011? >> because again i'm not going to try to talk to you in optimism but let's look at what's changed. you have republican leadership acknowledging for the first time in this debate in public that it's agreed to increase in revenues as part of an agreement that helps restore fiscal balance. that's a very important change. you can debate on what motivated that change, and of course it's true that approach has been a popular very substantial support among the american people. you have a much greater recognition that the economy would benefit on a carefully designed balanced agreement on fiscal reform and putting it off indefinitely is not good for the country. that's important, too. and i also think again if you listen carefully to what people are saying and what many politicians are saying with many elected representatives are saying there's a lot of
cuts for social security, medicare and medicaid. john boehner says we will talk more tax revenue in an overall tax system but we won't discuss without entitlement reform. that is the key for republicans. they will do tax revenue but it has got to be part of an overhaul of the tax system and has to involve medicare, medicaid and social security. exactly what, folks. but white house don't want to. melissa: leaders in d.c. are scrambling to figure this out but our first guest says he really does fear we're going to hit the fiscal cliff. think of while e. coyote and the acme parachute. scott hodge is president of the tax foundation. you are well known for innovative ideas on tax policy. in the 1990s you campaign to include a child credit in capital gains tax cuts. what is your best idea this time around? >> the best idea right now is for everybody to take a deep breath and pumped into next year. all the tax cuts should be extended for one more year to give congress and the white house some extra time to get off of their political posturing and make a rational deal between them. this
negotiate with speaker boehner, mitch mcconnell, or does he come in, give a set of demands and go hold a press conference? they can, i believe, hammer out -- >> same can the said on the other side, by the way. >> but if the president is willing to do it, the republicans have no choice. i mean, you can't turn down a president who just won re-election if he's sincere and willing to negotiate. >> going to take some bold initiatives which is my segue into your book, okay, because you've written this book about george washington and his bold moves to break the stalemate of the revolutionary war. so much has been written about george washington. what do you want readers to take away from this book that's new? >> well, i think particularly this morning is the launch of an american legacy book tour that calista and i are doing because she has two new children's books out for american history. the first thing is to say to people we have a long history of overcoming adversity. george washington is probably the greatest example of that, and in "victory at yorktown" you see him faced with a strate
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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